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Annual Ray Bradbury Creative Contest

29th Annual Ray Bradbury Creative Contest Winners

On June 5, we lost our literary luminary and friend Ray Bradbury at the age of 91. Ray was a true visionary whose contributions to the literary world stretch well beyond his many books, stories, poems and plays. In honor of Ray this year, we asked participants to consider the idea of “influence” when creating their entry. Ray always recognized Halloween as having a major impact on his life and writing. In turn, participants were asked to submit an entry that expressed how Ray Bradbury has been an inspiration to their own life or work. Deadline for entries was October 1, 2012.

Written

Non-resident High School: The Pen Meets Life by Rachana Balasubramanian

Non-resident Adult: Because I Say It Is So by Verna Cole Mitchell

Visual Arts

Resident Adult: My Own Timeline, Mi linea del Tiempo by Araceli Clemente (aided by first graders)

I am a first grade school teacher, when I received information about the contest I shared with my co-workers on our team and began to think how we could let our students and parents know about Ray Bradbury and his important contribution to worldwide literature.  We read to the students parts of Mr. Bradbury’s biography.  From the biography we illustrated parts of Mr. Bradbury’s life that our students could relate to.  Afterwards, we invited parents to create timelines of the “first years of life” of our students.  I have photographed almost 80 student timelines.  Our students now know who Mr. Bradbury is and share his joy of reading and writing in this important stage of their lives.

Resident High School: Ray Bradbury by Ivan Almazo

Ray Bradbury is such an inspiration for Waukegan I felt a portrait would be the best way to commemorate him.

Resident High School Honorable Mention: Rocket Man by Geovani Garcia

Ray Bradbury’s short story “Rocket Man” influences my work of art.  I thought the story was sad but in the end the Rocket Man died happy in the place he loved most which was outer space.

Non-Resident High School: Censored by Rachel Coacl

Ray Bradbury’s book Fahrenheit 451 has been a big influence on me.  His book has made me question who I am being censored by, who is watching, and controlling me.

Non-Resident Adult: Rocket Autumn III by Andy Burnside-Weaver

The stories of Mr. Ray Bradbury, and the time period in which they were written, have made a deep impact on my photography.  I set out on an adventure with my daughter and, through my lens; I find a Ray Bradbury story on almost all of them.  I snap a picture, and a story presents itself.  Many of his stories have children as the central character, and many of the children are wistful.  In this photograph of my daughter before a water tower under construction, is a little girl who wants more than anything to go to Mars, and has been denied every opportunity.  Behind her, the very last rocket to the Red Planet prepares to launch, and she waits for word to see if her name made the list.

Multimedia

Resident High School: The Last Night of the World (video) by Maria Pettis

 

I own very old and falling-apart copies of Fahrenheit 451 and The Illustrated Man. It was The Illustrated Man that first sparked my love for short stories. One of my favorite short stories in The Illustrated Man is “The Last Night of the World.” The simplicity of the characters and the idea that everyone would know and accept the world ending yet continue on with their lives despite the fact, is both original and very human. The characters all have the same recurring dream. They are accepting of fate. But this story is not synonymous with other doomsday stories. There is something both sweet and sinister about many of Bradbury’s short stories; this is what I wanted my short film to replicate. “The Last Night of the World” also inspired me to reconsider what the “world” is, and how “it” would end. I wanted to craft my own vision of what my last night of the world might look like, who I would spend it with, and what I would realize. The ending of my short film is purposely vague, a thought tactic I picked up from Ray Bradbury’s style. I want my viewers to be inspired to create their own last night scenario.

Resident Adult: Nice to Meet you Ray!, ¡Gusto Conocerte Ray! (powerpoint slideshow) by Araceli Clemente (aided by first graders)

 

I am a first grade school teacher, when I received information about the contest I shared with my co-workers on our team and began to think how we could let our students and parents know about Ray Bradbury and his important contribution to worldwide literature.  We read to the students parts of Mr. Bradbury’s biography.  From the biography we illustrated parts of Mr. Bradbury’s life that our students could relate to.  Afterwards, we invited parents to create timelines of the “first years of life” of our students.  I have photographed almost 80 student timelines.  Our students now know who Mr. Bradbury is and share his joy of reading and writing in this important stage of their lives.

 

Information about the 29th Annual Ray Bradbury Creative Contest

Eligibility: The contest is open to all age groups. The age groups are defined as Elementary, Middle School, High School, and Adult.*

Categories: Submissions will be separated into the categories of Elementary, Middle School, High School, and Adult, and then further separated into Waukegan Resident and Non-Resident. This results in a total of 24 categories.

Entries: Limit of one entry per category per individual. Entries must be titled. Untitled entries will be disqualified.

Formats accepted:

Text: Must be typed, 12 point, double-spaced, on white 8 1/2” x 11” paper, 1 copy. Text should be no longer than 2 single-side pages. Entries longer than 2 pages will be disqualified.**

Visual Arts: Submissions of sculptures, paintings, photographs, and drawings will be classified as visual art. A statement of how the piece is relevant to the contest topic must be submitted with the visual art on a note card. Entries without a statement card will be disqualified.**

Multimedia: Submissions of video and song will be classified as multimedia. A statement of how the piece is relevant to the contest topic must be submitted with the multimedia on a note card. Entries without a statement card will be disqualified.**

Prizes: Prizes were awarded in each category as specified below.

Resident

Text

Visual Art

Multimedia

Elementary

$50

$50

$50

Middle School

$50

$50

$50

High School

$50

$50

$50

Adult

$50

$50

$50

Non-Resident

Text

Visual Art

Multimedia

Elementary

Award Certificate

Award Certificate

Award Certificate

Middle School

Award Certificate

Award Certificate

Award Certificate

High School

Award Certificate

Award Certificate

Award Certificate

Adult

Award Certificate

Award Certificate

Award Certificate

 

At the criteria of the judges, Honorable Mentions were awarded. The winning entries are published on the Ray Bradbury Creative Contest page of the library web site and are on display at the library for one month after the winners were announced. Local winner entries will also be displayed at the Annual Ray Bradbury Storytelling Festival on October 26, 2012. One winning resident school text entry will be performed at the daytime school performance of the Annual Ray Bradbury Storytelling Festival by one of the storytellers.

*Library employees, board member, and their immediate family are not eligible to participate.
**Library is not responsible for lost or damaged displayed work.

If you have questions about the Creative Contest, please call David Villalobos at 847-623-2041 x 234, or email davidvillalobos [at] waukeganpl [dot] info.

Past Contest Winners 

28th Annual Winners (2011)

27th Annual Winners (2010)

26th Annual Winners (2009)